What is literacy for Mummy?

Teaching the FUNCTION of literacy is a great place to start with young ones.  Learning the letters is not anywhere on Master2’s radar but he IS very excited to help ‘write his name’ on his banana for daycare.

In his eyes, he IS writing his name!

In his eyes, he IS writing his name!

Can you involve your child in pretending to do this or ‘writing’ a shopping list or even drawing about their day?
This is all what’s called emergent literacy.  Stay tuned for a post on this soon

Identify your child’s interests and help them to learn!

Can you name five of your child’s interests (not including branded items)?
Does your child know they have interests?  Do you encourage them?  Have you pointed out how other children have different interests?  Did you know that the easiest way for a child to learn skills, is through their interests? 

2013 review…Reading a book to your child

And the next most-clicked on post for 2013 is, ‘So you think you know how to read a book to your child….? [birth to 12 months]‘.  If you need some inspiration for reading to your little one, take a look (and check under the ‘literacy’ file to find posts for reading to toddlers and the older kids).

Visit us at Facebook or now Google+ 🙂

Where is The Green Sheep? will captivate the youngest of audiences!

Where is The Green Sheep? will captivate the youngest of audiences!

Learning to spell..with my mouth??

So it’s time to learn to sound out words for spelling.  At first, it can be quite a daunting task for a little one.

Here is one trick I have found that helps with little children, or older kids who are having trouble sounding words out… It sounds complicated but give it a go.  Just having something tangible for them to focus on can really help.

First things first, go back a step.  Talk about how different sounds make up words and give your child examples.  At book reading time, you might point at a word and say ‘that says ‘cat’ – it is made up of the sounds ‘c-a-t’, ‘ca…t”.  At another time, you might sit with your child and go through each sound of the alphabet.  Or maybe just a few common sounds at first.

‘Study’ each sound and feel it in your mouth.  You might say to your child ‘let’s see which parts of our mouth make this sound’.  Have you ever stopped to think yourself?

– /m/, /b/, /p/, /w/ are made with our lips

– /k/, /g/ are made with the back of our tongue

– /n/, /t/, /d/, /l/, /r/, /s/, /z/ are made with the front of our tongue

– /f/, /th/, /v/, /ch/, /j/ are made with our lips and tongue

(the vowel sounds have nothing really getting in the way, it’s just our jaw height and tongue tension)

So now when your child starts to attempt to work out the last sound in a word, you can say ‘say the word and catch that last sound in your mouth, which parts of your mouth were moving?’.  Put the emphasis on ‘catch’ and make it sound like a fun thing to do.  Your child will then hopefully be able to say ‘caaaaaa..t’.  And you’ll encourage them to ‘catch that last sound!’ and identify which it was.  They will hopefully say ‘I could feel my tongue with /t/!’.  Or it might be working out the first sound.  Again, encourage them to slowly say the word and catch the first sound.  They will hopefully say ‘c….a’ and you might need to say ‘catch the first sound’.  And hopefully they will say ‘c, c’ – no need to identify what made the sound if they already identified it!

Sometimes just having taken the time to ‘study’ the sounds, children feel a little bit more confident and aware of what they are doing.  Knowledge is power!!

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List of books for children aged 4-7!!

Here is a compilation of books that are great for children aged between 4-7. Younger readers will love them as well and of course older ones love them too.

This is a great starting place for birthday presents 🙂

 

Books for Children Ages 4-7 (the following titles are suitable to be read to younger readers or can be read by beginning readers)

 

‘A.B. Paterson’s Mulga Bill’s Bicycle’ by Kilmeny & Deborah Niland

Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day by Judith Viorst

Amazing Grace by Mary Hoffman

Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish

Animalia by Graeme Base

Aranea: A Story About a Spider by Jenny Wagner

Are You My Mother? by Philip D. Eastman

‘Arthur’ series by Marc Tolon Brown

Basil of Baker Street by Eve Titus

Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina

Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by John Archambault

Clifford, the Big Red Dog by Norman Bridwell

Complete Adventures of Blinky Bill by Dorothy Wall

Counting on Frank by Rod Clement

Cowardly Clyde by Bill Peet

Curious George by Hans Augusto Rey

Fancy Nancy by Jane O’Conner

Fantastic Mr Fox, by Roald Dahl

Fox in Socks by Dr Seuss

Granpa by John Burningham

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss

How the Grinch Stole Christmas by Dr Seuss

Hubert’s Hair-raising Adventure by Bill Peet

If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff

In My Back Yard by Nette Hilton & Anne Spudvilas

Irving the Magician by Tohby Riddle

John Brown, Rose and the Midnight Cat by Jenny Wagner

Jumanji by Chris Van Allsburg

Lester and Clyde by James Reece

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes

Love You Forever by Robert N. Munsch

Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskey

‘My Hiroshima’ by Junko Morimoto

No Kiss for Mother by Tomi Ungerer

‘Oh, The Places You’ll Go’ by Dr. Seuss

Petunia by Roger Duvoisin

Red Sings from Treetops: A Year of Colors, by Joyce Sidman

Snugglepot and Cuddlepie by May Gibbs

Stellaluna by Janell Cannon

Strega Nona by Tomie De Paola

Sunshine by Jan Ormerod

Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig

Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo

The Art Lesson by Tomie De Paola

The Banana Bird and the Snake Men by Percy Trezise and Dick Roughsey

The Bears’ ABC Book by Robin & Jocelyn Wild

The Cat in the Hat by Dr. Seuss

The Complete Adventures of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

‘The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh’ by A. A. Milne

The Digging-est Dog by Al Perkins

The Eleventh Hour by Graeme Base

The Enchanted Wood by Enid Blyton

The Fisherman and the Theefyspray by Jane Tanner

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein

The Jolly Postman or Other People’s Letters by Janet & Allen Ahlberg

The Lighthouse Keeper’s Lunch by Ronda & David Armitage

The Little Engine That Could by Watty Piper

The Little House by Virginia Lee Burton

The Lorax by Dr. Seuss

The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay

The Napping House by Audrey Wood

The Paper Bag Princess by Robert N. Munsch

The Polar Express by Chris Van Allsburg

The Rainbow Serpent by Dick Roughsey

The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf

The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter

‘The True Story of the Three Little Pigs’ by Jon Scieszka

‘The Story of Shy the Platypus’ by Leslie Rees

The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams

Tough Boris by Mem Fox

What Made Tiddalik Laugh by Joanna Troughton

Wheel on the Chimney by Margaret Wise Brown

Where’s Julius by John Burningham

Where the Forest Meets the Sea by Jeannie Baker

‘Where the Sidewalk Ends: the Poems and Drawing of Shel Silverstein’ by Shel Silverstein

Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak

Whistle Up the Chimney by Nan Hunt

Wilfrid Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox